Chapter 3: Markets

What will you learn in this chapter? • Characteristics of a competitive market. • How to construct a demand curve. • Shift in vs. a movement along the demand curve. • How to construct a supply curve. • Shift in supply vs. movement along supply curve. • How demand and supply interact to bring markets to equilibrium. • How changes in supply and demand influence equilibrium price and quantity

pdf14 trang | Chia sẻ: thanhlam12 | Ngày: 14/01/2019 | Lượt xem: 19 | Lượt tải: 0download
Bạn đang xem nội dung tài liệu Chapter 3: Markets, để tải tài liệu về máy bạn click vào nút DOWNLOAD ở trên
1© 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 1 Chapter 3 Markets © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 2 What will you learn in this chapter? • Characteristics of a competitive market. • How to construct a demand curve. • Shift in vs. a movement along the demand curve. • How to construct a supply curve. • Shift in supply vs. movement along supply curve. • How demand and supply interact to bring markets  to equilibrium. • How changes in supply and demand influence  equilibrium price and quantity. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 3 Markets • A market refers to the buyers and sellers who trade a  particular good or service. – Markets can be located locally, globally, or even virtually. • One special class of markets is the competitive market. • Four characteristics of perfectly competitive markets. • In this chapter, markets are assumed to be perfectly  competitive. Standardized good No transaction costs  Full information  Participants are price takers  2© 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 4 Demand • As a group, consumers determine the demand for a product. • The quantity demanded is the amount of a  particular good or service that buyers are  willing and able to purchase at a given price. • The law of demand states that the lower the  price, the higher the quantity demanded, all  other things equal. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 5 Cell phones (millions) Price ($) 30 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 60 180 140 160 120 100 80 60 40 20 The demand schedule • A demand schedule  displays the quantities  demanded at various  prices. • This demand schedule  provides the quantity of  cellphones demanded at  specific prices. • Notice that as price falls,  the quantity demanded  increases. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 6 Cell phones (millions) Price ($) 30 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 60 180 140 160 120 100 80 60 40 20 The demand curve Quantity of cell phones (millions) 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 1. As the price decreases 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 Price ($) 2. the quantity demand  increases. The demand curve illustrates the relationship between the quantity demanded and the  price of the good, holding all of the other non‐price determinants constant. 3© 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 7 Active Learning: Constructing demand Use the following demand schedule to construct the demand curve. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 140 160 180 200 220 240 260 280 300 P Q Price Quantity 1 280 2 260 3 240 4 220 5 200 6 180 7 160 8 140 © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 8 Changes in demand • The five most important non‐price  determinants of demand are: • What happens when one of the non‐price  determinants changes? – If positive influence, demand increases. – If negative influence, demand decreases. Preferences Number of buyers Incomes Expectations Price of related goods © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 9 • When demand  increases, the  demand curve shifts  to the right. • When demand  decreases, the  demand curve shifts  to the left. Shifting the demand curve 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 0 60 120 180 240 Quantity of cell phones (millions) Price ($) DA DB DC 4© 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 10 Shifts versus movements There is an important difference between a shift in the demand  curve and a movement along the demand curve. If the price decreases, then quantity  demanded increases and there is a  movement along the demand curve.  If a non‐price determinant changes,  then the demand curve shifts with  changes in the quantity demanded  at every price. Quantity of cell phones (millions) 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 60 120 180 240 Price ($) DB DA DC D Quantity of cell phones (millions) 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 60 120 180 240 Price ($) © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 11 Active Learning: Shifts vs. movements Indicate whether a shift or movement occurs in  the market for cellphones when each of the  following determinants changes. – Advertising causes individuals to prefer cellphones  over home phones. – Cellphones go on sale. – Cellphone calling plans become more expensive. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 12 Supply • As a group, producers determine the supply of  a product. • The quantity supplied is the amount of a  particular good that producers are willing and  able to purchase at a given price. • The law of supply states that the higher the  price, the higher the quantity supplied, all  other things equal. 5© 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 13 Cell phones (millions) Price ($) 270 210 180 150 120 90 60 30 240 180 140 160 120 100 80 60 40 20 The supply schedule • A supply schedule  displays the  quantities supplied at  various prices. • This supply schedule  provides the quantity  of cellphones  supplied at specific  prices. • Notice that as price  increases, the  quantity supplied  increases. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 14 Cell phones (millions) Price ($) 270 210 180 150 120 90 60 30 240 180 140 160 120 100 80 60 40 20 The supply curve 2. quantity supplied increases 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 Price ($) Quantity of cell  phones (millions) 1. As price increases © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 15 Active Learning: Constructing supply Use the following supply schedule to construct the supply curve. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 140 160 180 200 220 240 260 280 300 P Q Price Quantity 1 130 2 260 3 390 4 520 5 650 6 780 7 910 8 1040 6© 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 16 Changes in supply • The five most important non‐price  determinants of supply are: • What happens when one of the non‐price  determinants changes? – If positive influence, supply increases. – If negative influence, supply decreases. Technology Number of producers Price of Inputs Expectations Price of related goods © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 17 • When supply  increases, the supply  curve shifts to the  right. • When supply  decreases, the supply  curve shifts to the  left. Shifting the supply curve 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 0 60 120 180 240 300 Quantity of cell phones (millions) Price ($) SA SC SB © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 18 Shifts versus movements There is an important difference between a shift in the supply  curve and a movement along the supply curve. If a non‐price determinant changes,  then the supply curve shifts with  changes in the quantity supplied at  every price. If the price decreases, then quantity  supplied decreases and there is a  movement along the supply curve.  Quantity of cell phones (millions) 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 60 120 180 300240 Price ($) S C S A S B Quantity of cell phones (millions) 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 60 120 180 300240 Price ($) SA 7© 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 19 Active Learning: Shifts vs. movements • Indicate whether a shift or movement occurs  in the market for cellphones when each of the  following determinants change. – A new Chinese cellphone manufacturer enters the  market. – Producers expect cellphones prices to rise. – The price of calling over the Internet (e.g. Skype)  decreases. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 20 Market equilibrium • The equilibrium is where  the supply curve  intersects the demand  curve. – At this point, consumers  are willing to buy exactly  what producers are  willing to sell. • The equilibrium price is  $100. • The equilibrium quantity  is 150 M.Quantity of cell phones (millions) 0 200 50 100 150 300200 250 Price ($) S D 50 100 150 © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 21 Active Learning: Finding equilibrium 1) Graph the supply and demand curve and find the equilibrium. 2) Circle the market equilibrium price and quantity in the schedule. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 140 160 180 200 220 240 260 280 300 Q P Price QS QD 1 130 280 2 260 260 3 390 240 4 520 220 5 650 200 6 780 180 7 910 160 8 1040 140 8© 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 22 Disequilibrium • What happens when the market is not in  equilibrium? • If the market price is not equal to the equilibrium  price, then quantity demanded is not equal to  quantity supplied. – If the price is too high, excess supply occurs and there  is a surplus of the good or service. • A lower price alleviates the surplus. – If the price is too low, excess demand occurs and there  is a shortage of the good or service. • A higher price alleviates the shortage. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 23 A surplus • A surplus provides incentives for  the price to decrease.  • As the price decreases 1) The quantity supplied  decreases. 2) The quantity  demanded increases. • The price continues to decrease  until QS  = QD = Q*. QD QS 40 80 160 120 200 300 Price ($) Quantity of cell phones (millions) 0 60 120 180 240 S D Surplus (excess supply) Price is too high © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 24 A shortage • A shortage provides incentives for  the price to increase.  • As the price increases 1) The quantity supplied  increases. 2) The quantity demanded  decreases. • The price continues to increase  until QS  = QD = Q*. S D Quantity of cell phones (millions) 0 40 80 160 120 200 60 120 180 300240 Price ($) Shortage (excess demand) Price is too low QS QD 9© 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 25 Active Learning: Excess supply 1) Find the quantity demanded and quantity supplied at a price of $3. 2) Quantify the excess supply (surplus). P QS QD 1 130 280 2 260 260 3 390 240 4 520 220 5 650 200 6 780 180 7 910 160 8 1040 140 © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 26 Active Learning: Excess demand 1) Find the quantity demanded and quantity supplied at a price of $1. 2) Quantify the excess demand (shortage). P QS QD 1 130 280 2 260 260 3 390 240 4 520 220 5 650 200 6 780 180 7 910 160 8 1040 140 © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 27 Changes in market equilibrium • The equilibrium price and quantity are determined by the  intersection of the demand and supply curves. • If a non‐price factor changes, this affects the market  equilibrium. • To determine the effect on market equilibrium, there are  three questions that must be answered: – Does the change affect demand? If so, how? – Does the change affect supply? If so, how? – What happens to equilibrium price and quantity? 10 © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 28 Shifts in demand Suppose the price of land‐line service suddenly  skyrockets. D2 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 Quantity of cell phones (millions) Price ($) D1 S2 • Market for cellphones is in  equilibrium. • More expensive substitute  causes the demand to  increase. • The demand curve shifts right. • The market equilibrium  changes. – Equilibrium price increases. – Equilibrium quantity increases. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 29 Active Learning: Equilibrium effects from  shifts in demand P QS QD Q’D 8 270 30 7 240 60 6 210 90 5 180 120 4 150 150 3 120 180 2 90 210 1 60 240 Suppose the demand curve shifts outward by 60 units. Update  the demand schedule and find the new equilibrium price and  quantity. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 30 S2 Shifts in supply • Market for cellphones is  initially in equilibrium. • Increased technology causes  the supply to increase. • The supply curve shifts right. • The market equilibrium  changes. – Equilibrium price decreases. – Equilibrium quantity  increases. Suppose there is a breakthrough in battery technology. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 Quantity of cell phones (millions) Price ($) D1 S1 11 © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 31 Active Learning: Equilibrium effects from  shifts in supply D S P Q P* Q* Ice Cream Market Suppose the cost of sugar, an input for making ice cream,  increases. Identify whether supply, demand, or both shift(s)  and the new equilibrium price and quantity for ice cream. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 32 Shifts in demand or supply When either demand or supply changes, there is  an unambiguous effect on equilibrium price and  quantity. Curve Change Price change Quantity change Supply Decrease Supply Increase Demand Decrease Demand Increase © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 33 Shifts in both demand and supply • It is possible for non‐price factors that influence both  demand and supply at the same time. • This leads to shifts in both demand and supply. • The new equilibrium occurs at the new intersection. • Suppose that landline phone service prices increase  and an input price to make cellphones decreases. – Demand increases. – Supply increases. • What happens to equilibrium price and quantity? – It depends on whether the demand or supply curve shifts  out more. 12 © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 34 Shifts in both demand and supply New equilibrium – Quantity increases. – Price increases. Conclusion: Quantity increases. Price may increase or decrease (ambiguous). New equilibrium – Quantity increases. – Price decreases. Quantity of cell phones (millions) 0 60 40 20 100 80 120 140 200 180 160 30 60 90 120 150 300180 210 240 270 Price ($) (A) Demand increases more S 1 D 2 S 2 E1 E2 D 1 (B) Supply increases more Quantity of cell phones (millions) 0 60 40 20 100 80 120 140 200 180 160 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 Price ($) S 1 S 2 E E D D 2 1 2 1 © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 35 Shifts in demand and supply When both supply and demand shift and the  magnitudes of change are unknown, the effect  on either price or quantity is known, but not  both. Supply change Demand change Price change Quantity change Decrease Decrease Decrease Increase Increase Increase Increase Decrease © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 36 Summary • A market is the group of buyers and sellers  who trade. – A competitive market exists if a large number of  buyers and sellers trade standardized goods and  services. –Modeled using supply and demand. 13 © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 37 Summary • Demand demonstrates consumers’ highest  willingness to pay for a given quantity. • The law of demand states that the quantity  demanded increases as the price decreases. – The demand curve has a negative slope. • When one of the non‐price determinants of  demand changes, the entire demand curve  shifts to the left or the right. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 38 Summary • Supply demonstrates producers’ lowest price  that they must receive to sell a given quantity. • The law of supply states that the quantity  supplied increases as the price increases. – The supply curve has a positive slope. • When one of the non‐price determinants of  supply changes, the entire supply curve shifts  to the left or the right. © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 39 Summary • The equilibrium price and quantity are identified  when quantity supplied equals quantity  demanded. At this point: – Producers sell all they desire at the equilibrium price. – Consumers buy all they desire at the equilibrium price. • If the market price is not equal to the equilibrium  price, then a surplus or shortage exists, and the  price adjusts until quantity demanded is equal to  quantity supplied. 14 © 2014 by McGraw‐Hill Education 40 Summary • When a non‐price determinant changes, the  effect on equilibrium price and quantity can be  evaluated by: – Determining whether supply, demand, or both are  affected. – Determining the direction supply, demand, or both  shift(s). – Comparing the new equilibrium to the initial  equilibrium to identify the effect on price and  quantity.
Tài liệu liên quan