Science 1: Associate degree in Education - Lecture 3: Populations and Ecosystems

To engage Student Teachers in experiencing inquiry science first-hand To make them comfortable with the discipline To eliminate any concerns or fears they may have about science. WHAT’S IN THE LECTURE study of life science using a macroscopic approach explore ecosystems and get a sense of how unity and diversity carry through all of biology examine the basic needs of living things and their interdependencies. In addition, you will learn to explain how some species thrive and populations grow but others become extinct. how organisms are interconnected with each other in an ecosystem and also with the nonliving components in their environment. factors that affect population size and how populations change over time. identify the effects of human activities and naturally occurring changes to ecosystems, as well as the results of those changes

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Lecture # 3 SCIENCE 1 ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN EDUCATION POPULATIONS AND ECOSYSTEMSOBJECTIVES OF THE LECTURE To engage Student Teachers in experiencing inquiry science first-hand To make them comfortable with the disciplineTo eliminate any concerns or fears they may have about science.WHAT’S IN THE LECTURE study of life science using a macroscopic approach explore ecosystems and get a sense of how unity and diversity carry through all of biologyexamine the basic needs of living things and their interdependencies. In addition, you will learn to explain how some species thrive and populations grow but others become extinct. how organisms are interconnected with each other in an ecosystem and also with the nonliving components in their environment. factors that affect population size and how populations change over time. identify the effects of human activities and naturally occurring changes to ecosystems, as well as the results of those changesLECTURE OUTCOME Student Teachers should be able to:investigate the interdependence of living things (including humans) in an ecosysteminvestigate how changes in environments affect plants and animals (including humans) explain how adaptive characteristics of a species affect its chance for survival or possible extinctiondescribe factors that limit or support the growth of populations within an ecosystem analyze data collected over time and explain how disruption in one part of an ecosystem can repeat throughout an ecosystem begin to identify the unit’s underlying core science concepts for children in elementary grades and design age-appropriate, inquiry-based activities and learning outcomes.VOCABULARY biotic and abiotic factors, interdependency, biological niches, ecosystems, biomes, species, population, population growth survival and extinction, food chains/webs, dynamic equilibriumBASIC NEEDS OF LIVING THINGS AND INTERDEPENDENCIES IN ECOSYSTEMS Student Teachers examine how organisms in an ecosystem are interconnected with each other and also with the nonliving components in their environment. They study a specific habitat and determine the interactions among the organisms living there. They also identify the components needed for life to existA HANDS-ON INQUIRY ACTIVITYTake your Student outside to a patch of natural land that is not sealed by brick or asphalt. You don’t have to go far away from the classroom. A grass patch, tree, or brush area on campus or next to a road will do.Start by asking Student what they expect to find on that patch of land. Make sure they list living and nonliving things from a microscopic to a macroscopic level. Divide the class into small groups. Then instruct each group to choose a 1 square-metre patch that they will carefully explore. If your Students are not used to open-ended inquiry explorations, provide them with guidance. For example, make the borderlines of their plot visible by using a string or drawing a line. Also, help them develop a strategy on how to fully explore the plot for all living and nonliving things and record their findings. If possible, don’t prescribe everything for the entire class. Instead, let different groups develop their own strategies. A HANDS-ON INQUIRY ACTIVITY continue ..In these first sessions, set the stage for a course of science that is defined by open-minded explorations. Encourage Students to ask questions that they then try to explore and answer. Let curiosity, thoughts, and proof be the driving forces. It is not about being right or wrong; rather, is about forming good questions, developing an exploration strategy, and making conclusions based on recorded observations and data. Encourage Students to question each other and not to shy away from asking critical questions. Set the tone for a rich science course that fosters inquiry and scientific discussion rather than lectures. In a nutshell, help Students build knowledge rather than just taking in knowledge. Learning through experience and reflection will last a lifetime. It will also help convey the beauty of the natural world and science overall. A HANDS-ON INQUIRY ACTIVITY continue ..If your Student Teachers struggle with the inquiry approach, provide some guidance by asking the following questions for them to explore:Do you expect your plot to have many different kinds of organisms or just a few? List as many different kinds that might live in your ecosystem.How do you think the living and nonliving components interact with each other?List at least five resources that living organisms use in this plot.What factors might determine what kinds of organisms live in each plot?Do you think your plot will be the same tomorrow? Next month? Next year? Explain your response.A HANDS-ON INQUIRY ACTIVITY continue ..While Students work in their respective plots, circle among them. Remember not to correct or evaluate them at this point. Instead, encourage them to work with one another. Working together and thinking about the prior knowledge that each of them brings to the task should allow them to develop a strong strategy and a good data-collection method. Engage students in conversationA HANDS-ON INQUIRY ACTIVITY continue ..You can initiate a conversation with them by asking the following questions:What are you doing? What is your plan? What are you observing? How are you recording your observations and findings so you can share them with the other groups? What do you expect to find? Has anything surprised you?
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